Tag Archives: UVM

Farmer input wanted on surveys

Agricultural research done in universities and institutions can have a big impact on policy and funding, as well as the development of practical tools, techniques, breeds, and more for farmers. Often one of the first steps in a research project is a survey – to determine the level of need or interest, or to gather a snapshot of perspectives and information. There are a few surveys out at the moment that could use the input of Vermont farmers, and we hope you’ll take a few minutes out of your busy harvest season to fill out one or more.

Survey on Raw Manure Application and Grazing in Fruit and Vegetable Production

Please complete this survey by October 22.

Under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) the Food and Drug Administration is seeking comments from stakeholders to determine the appropriate interval between application of raw manure/or grazing of animals in certain crops. They are also proposing that farmers who use raw manure to transition to using composted manure. UVM Extension’s Center for Sustainable Agriculture is trying to understand:

  • How farmers who grow fruits and vegetables for sale are using raw manure or grazing animals in fruit and vegetable production areas
  • How these farmers might be impacted if the recommended interval between the application of raw manure (or grazing animals) in areas where fruits and vegetables are grown, and harvesting the produce is extended
  • What barriers may exist for farmers if they were to transition from using raw manure to treated compost

Take the Raw Manure survey by October 22 »

2014 Organic Farmer Seed Survey

The purpose of this survey from the Organic Seed Alliance is to better assess certified organic crop producers’ attitudes and perceptions regarding organic seed. The purpose is also to understand producers’ current use of organic seed and any obstacles that restrict organic seed sourcing. Producers should be prepared to offer best estimates on their organic seed usage or have their seed records on hand. The survey also asks which crops and traits should be prioritized through organic plant breeding programs.

If you are a certified organic crop producer, please take ten minutes to respond to this survey, even if you currently do not use organic seed.

Take the Organic Seed survey »

Survey Regarding the Impact of Regulations on Farming Activities

The focus of this survey from the University of Connecticut is to better understand the state and local regulatory environment for agricultural production within your state.

Take the Farming Regulation survey »

UVM Food Systems Summit

NOFA Vermont is proud to be a featured partner of the UVM Food Systems Summit. Almost half of our staff plans to attend – if you’d like to as well, registration closes today at midnight. If you’d like to attend after that point, call call UVM Conference and Events Services at 802-656-5665. Walk-in registrations will be accepted on a first come, first served basis.

Who should own and control the food system? How much additional food production capacity do we need and where? How do cultural values influence food practice? Food systems scholars and leaders will address these questions and more when they convene at the University of Vermont (UVM) June 17-18 for the third annual UVM Food Systems Summit to share research and engage in dialogue on the pressing food systems issues facing our world.

With a vibrant local food economy, Vermont is a hot spot of sustainable food system development, and a prime location to explore the innovative models that are providing solutions to the multitude of social, environmental, health and economic problems arising from our broken food system. During the day and a half conference, sessions will address the following themes: the biophysical constraints we face for food production globally, the impact of our geopolitical context on our food system, and the implications of behavior and culture for our food system.

“UVM is a leading academic institution in the transdisciplinary study of food systems, and Vermont is a national model in alternative food system development with its network-based, systems-approach,” said Doug Lantagne, director of the UVM Food Systems Initiative. “Our goal is for food systems researchers, leaders, practitioners, and engaged community members to come together at the summit and expand their knowledge, network with peers to generate future collaborations, identify needs and prioritize future work.”

The summit will transcend the boundaries of academia by incorporating food systems efforts happening outside the ivory tower. Unlike traditional academic conferences, the summit is designed to optimize engagement between scholars and practitioners outside of academia. As such, the summit is open to the public, and the organizers are seeking participation from nonprofits, government, farmers and food producers.

Three keynote speakers will each provide a one-hour talk as well as participate in a panel discussion at the end of the summit: Rosamond Naylor, director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University, Eric Holt-Giménez, executive director of Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy, and Nicholas Freudenberg, Distinguished Professor of Public Health at City University of New York’s School of Public Health and Hunter College.

Panel discussions will feature research and examples of how local-level responses are responding to globalization in the food system. To promote dialogue among all participants, all sessions will include time for Q&A and engaged dialogue with the audience. Participants will enjoy local foods and drink during a Taste of Vermont reception.

[post from Alison Nihart, UVM]

Improve Your Farm Business: A program guide

A successful farm requires solid business and management skills as well as the ability to judge when a tomato is ripe or a calf is sick. There are a number of resources in Vermont designed to help beginning (and experienced) farmers cultivate their management, accounting, planning, and organizing skills – and many of them have enrollment deadlines coming up soon!

Jake Torrey of Honey Locust Farm in Bradford, VT, is a 2013 Journey Farmer.
Jake Torrey of Honey Locust Farm in Bradford, VT, is a 2013 Journey Farmer.

One such program is NOFA Vermont’s Journey Farmer program, designed to help beginning farmers succeed by matching them with experienced farmer mentors, providing them with educational opportunities (including free entrance to our upcoming Winter Conference and an educational stipend), and providing personalized technical and business planning assistance. The application period for this program is currently open through December 18. The Journey Farmer Program is for farmers with a few years of experience, secured access to land, and the intention to farm commercially in Vermont.

If you don’t fit that description, or have different needs, there are other great programs available for everyone from experienced farmers looking to expand or diversify, to aspiring farmers and entrepreneurs interested in testing the waters. Continue reading Improve Your Farm Business: A program guide