Category Archives: For Farmers

Highlights of our work in 2015

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Here are some highlights of our work in 2015:

 

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New videos address the question, ‘Why Organic?’

Vermont Organic Farmers releases videos and brochure to convey the benefits of buying organic, and growing organically
Vermont Organic Farmers (VOF) has developed a collection of outreach materials that explain and support the organic certification process, and promote organic products. The materials include a series of short videos for consumers that convey the benefits of buying organic products, a longer video that explains the certification process, and a beautifully designed brochure that addresses the reasons for farmers and processors to become certified. These materials can be used and shared by anyone interested in promoting organic agriculture.
In response to requests from certified organic producers to help increase demand for organic products in the marketplace, Vermont Organic Farmers (VOF) developed five consumer-focused video clips, designed for easy sharing online, to show the importance and value of organic production. Each video features one benefit, or value, of buying organic products: “No GMOs”, “Taste, “Stewardship”, “Community” and “Integrity”.  These values are articulated by organic growers in Vermont, and were filmed on-farm, providing an intimate glimpse into the world of sustainable agriculture. (All the videos can be found on the NOFA Vermont YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwGgmXsdmFP45nSGt-Bx0gbj8hRRLbwfE)
“We are really excited for consumers to get to know the growers of their food better,” said Nicole Dehne, who directs the VOF certification program. “This is a chance for folks to hear directly from the farmers about why they feel it is important to farm organically.”
VOF has also produced a longer video that demystifies the organic certification process for farmers interested in pursuing organic certification. This film will be used as mentoring support and motivation for producers who are interested in learning more about the process. Through various outreach efforts, the video will reach a broader consumer audience and  build confidence among buyers that the certification process is meaningful.  Viewers will hear directly from organic growers, why they certify their farm as organic and what that process means to them and to their market.  After watching the film, viewers will better understand the annual inspection process, the record keeping requirements, and the benefits of organic certification for their business.

As a companion to the videos, VOF has created an brochure for farmers interested in pursuing organic certification (http://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/NOFA-VTBrochure.pdf), which outlines five benefits of  becoming certified organic and also addresses concerns, such as the burden of record keeping and the cost of certification.

The project was funded with support from the USDA National Organic Program’s “Sound & Sensible Initiative,” a campaign that aims to make organic certification more accessible, affordable and attainable. Other resources from the campaign can be found on the USDA website: http://blogs.usda.gov/2015/11/09/organic-sound-and-sensible-resources-why-go-organic-and-where-to-start/ 

 

Vermont NRCS announces Nov. 20 deadline for Vermont farmers to apply for EQIP assistance

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced November 20, 2015, as the first cut-off date to apply for fiscal year 2016 funds through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).”EQIP provides tremendous support to Vermont farmers and landowners interested in addressing natural resource problems on their land,” State Conservationist Vicky Drew said.  She encouraged farmers wishing to utilize EQIP financial assistance to implement conservation practices next spring to submit an application by the November 20th deadline. While EQIP is offered through a continuous signup, NRCS makes periodic funding selections.

This year, VT NRCS will make available a total of $11,000,000 to farmers and forest landowners in VT to help plan and implement conservation practices that address natural resource concerns and for opportunities to improve soil, water, plant, animal, air and related resources on agricultural land and non-industrial private forestland. Approximately 75% of the funds that are available will be targeted toward conservation practices that support water quality improvements in the Lake Champlain watershed.  EQIP can also help Vermont farmers meet Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

EQIP is an important Farm Bill conservation program that helps established farmers as well as beginning, historically underserved, and limited resource producers. Learn more by visiting the Vermont NRCS EQIP website at www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/vt/home/ or contact your local NRCS office.

A Profile of NOFA-VT’s Journey Farmers

The Journey Farmer Program is a two-year program for beginning farmers who are in the first few years of running their own farming enterprise in Vermont. The program is largely shaped by the farming interests and goals of the Journey Farmers, and enables aspiring new farmers to advance their farming skills and experiences, along with being a part of a learning community of other aspiring farmers and farmer mentors. NOFA-VT Journey Farmers receive an educational stipend, farmer-to-farmer mentoring, free admission into NOFA-VT’s workshops and Winter Conference, business planning support and access to technical assistance by the NOFA-VT staff. New farmers are being welcomed to the fold each year…find out more about the application process here.

NOFA-VT’s Journey Farmer program accepting applications for 2016

Program provides training, mentoring, educational stipend, and more

Journey Farmer Ansel Ploog
“Being a Journey Farmer has helped us access expertise from mentors and provided a readily available sounding-board for farming questions,” said Ansel Ploog of Fly Wheel Farm in Woodbury, Vermont.

The Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont is now accepting applications for the 2016 Journey Farmer Program. The Journey Farmer Program is a two-year program for beginning farmers who are in the first few years of running their own farming enterprise in Vermont. The deadline to apply for the program is November 19th, 2015.

The Journey Farmer program was developed in 2011 to help farmers successfully bridge the gap from education and apprenticeships to viable commercial enterprises. To reach these goals, the program provides farmer-to-farmer mentoring, free admission into NOFA-VT’s Summer Workshop Series and Winter Conference, business planning support, access to technical assistance, and an educational stipend. Journey Farmers also become part of a supportive network made up of other beginning farmers and farmer mentors by participating in special gatherings, educational offerings and events.

“Being a Journey Farmer has helped us access expertise from mentors and provided a readily available sounding-board for farming questions,” said Ansel Ploog of Fly Wheel Farm in Woodbury, Vermont.

“During our ‘journeyship’ our farm has gone from a lean start-up to a business with specific production and financial goals and we have confidence that we can achieve them.”

The program is largely shaped by the farming interests and goals of the Journey Farmers themselves, and enables aspiring new farmers to advance their farming skills and experiences, along with being a part of a learning community of other aspiring farmers and farmer mentors. To date, 30 Journey Farmers have participated in the program. This year, three to five new Journey Farms will be selected to participate.

For more information, and application information, visit www.nofavt.org/beginning-farmer/journey-farmer. Applications and resumes are due by November 19, 2015. Couples and/or business partners should submit one joint application. If you have any questions regarding the program, criteria for selection, or the application please contact Rachel Fussell, Education Coordinator, at rachel@nofavt.org or call (802) 434-4122.

The NOSB Annual Meeting is coming to Vermont, and we really want you to attend on October 27th!

By Nicole Dehne, VOF Certification Administrator

On October 27th, organic farmers, consumers, environmentalists, representatives from large organic corporations, and others will be coming to Vermont to discuss organic farming and production practices at the Stoweflake Conference Center in Stowe.  They are coming to attend the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) meeting and will come prepared to make public comment to the board and to witness the discussions regarding which materials should be allowed for use by organic farmers and processors.

The Organic Foods Production Act established the NOSB as an advisory committee for the National Organic Program (NOP) in 1990.  Although there is disagreement in the industry as to how extensive the board’s authority is to determine organic farming and production practices, what is clear is that the NOSB has authority over the National List of materials that are allowed to be used by farmers and processors when growing, raising, or producing organic products.  Twice a year the NOSB has a public meeting in different towns across the United States.  The meeting is intentionally moved around in order to give producers in the region where the meeting is being hosted the opportunity to participate in this important event.

Typically, NOSB meetings last 4 to 5 days and include presentations by NOP staff reporting on topics that include enforcement activities, new procedures, and work plan priorities.  What attendees really come to hear is the 15-member board discussing agenda items and voting on recommendations and materials allowed for use on organic farms and in organic food.  A large part of the meeting is comprised of comments from the public.  Each individual signed up for public comment is given 5 minutes to address the board and the NOP staff also present at the meeting.  In-person public comment is very effective in influencing the members of the committee and helping them understand the unique perspective of the speaker.  There are many different opinions represented at this meeting.  Often consumers and consumer groups are present asking the NOSB to keep the organic standards strict and meaningful.  Experts are often called in to present on different materials and how they are used.  Representatives from large corporations are there to present on why a material might be important for their organic processed product.  One voice that is frequently missing is that of the small diversified farmer who may not have the means or time to attend the meeting. Therefore, his or her perspective is often not being given a first-hand account.  This year’s meeting in Vermont provides a great opportunity to give voice to the concerns of small and diversified producers in our state.

Curious about some of the topics that the NOSB is working on and whether they might affect your business?  There are 200 materials up for review at this fall meeting. That is an unusually large amount of materials for the board to review and vote on.  The NOSB will discuss each of these materials and their importance to organic producers.  If they hear from the public that a material is no longer needed or shouldn’t be allowed in organic production, they may vote to remove it from the list of allowed materials.  Whether you are a vegetable, livestock, dairy or food processor you are likely to find something in this list that you use on a regular basis.  The following are examples of materials that will be voted on at this meeting: hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, newspaper without glossy or colored inks, plastic mulch, elemental sulfur, horticultural oils, pheromones, copper sulfate and fixed coppers, lime sulfur, soluble boron products, aspirin, atropine, butorphanol, chlorhexidine, electrolytes, fenbendazole, flunixin, ivermectin, moxidectin, oxytocin, vaccines, lidocaine, dairy cultures, diatomaceous earth, enzymes, flavors, kaolin, yeast, nutrient vitamins and minerals, casings, and more!

In addition, there are topics worth mentioning to the committee despite the fact that they will not be on this meeting’s agenda.  For example, it will be important for the committee to hear about whether organic vegetable farmers should be able to use biodegradable mulch, or why organic poultry producers should be required to give meaningful outdoor access year round, or why hydroponic production should not be allowed in organic certification.

Approximately four weeks before each NOSB meeting, members of the public may submit written comments or sign up to deliver oral comments in person.  Check the NOFA website for more information about how to sign up for comments or about the meeting in general.  If you only have time to attend one day, a half day, or even just a few hours, it is worth attending to participate or to just witness this important process.  In addition, for those producers or consumers willing to address the board, this is your opportunity to get your voice heard about topics important to the organic community.

We hope to see you there!

Keeping the Soil in Certified Organic

A Conversation with Dave Chapman of Long Wind Farm

DAVE CHAPMANDave Chapman is the owner of Long Wind Farm in East Thetford, where he grows certified organic greenhouse tomatoes. For several years, Dave has been speaking out strongly against USDA’s decision to allow hydroponically produced vegetables in organic certification. Although USDA’s National Organic Program (NOP) has allowed some hydroponic operations to be certified organic, Vermont Organic Farmers (VOF) does not certify hydroponically grown produce.

With this year’s National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) meeting in Stowe approaching, I asked Dave to share some of his thoughts on why hydroponics should not be allowed in organic certification and the implications of this issue for organic producers and consumers.

MM: Tell us how you got involved with the issue of hydroponics being allowed in certified organic. Can you summarize the problem as you see it?

DC: I got involved back around 2009 when the NOSB was having public hearings on whether or not hydroponic growing should be allowed for organic certification. Then, about three years ago I began to see a LOT of hydroponic tomatoes pouring into the organic wholesale market. Many of my customers were cutting back their orders, as the low priced hydroponic tomatoes came in. Of course the hydroponic stuff was cheaper than real organic tomatoes. This had a pretty strong effect in Vermont, where Deep Root lost Whole Foods as a customer for their tomatoes. Whole Foods is divided into different regions, with each region having a separate buyer. The buyer for southern Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York decided to drop the soil grown organic tomatoes and go exclusively for Mexican hydroponic, based entirely on price. As a result, all the New England organic tomato growers lost that account.

Organic certification was created to help eaters know what they were buying, and to make an open pact between the people who wanted to buy organic food and the farmers who wanted to grow and sell it. BUT we are now at a real crossroad. Certainly most organic growers would not consider a tomato grown on a little bag of coconut husk suspended 3 feet over the ground and fed entirely through an IV drip system to be organically grown. Nor would most organic consumers, if they were given a tour of a large glass greenhouse with thirty acres of suspended plants and not a speck of soil in sight. This is all so far from the ideals that organic farming was built on. Organic is based on protecting and enhancing the health and vitality of the soil.

The problem is that organic consumers are mostly pretty far removed from how their food is grown. Go into any supermarket on the east coast. Most of them will have an organic section now. Even Walmart has an organic section now! That should be a wonderful thing. But virtually ALL of the “organic” tomatoes in any of these thousands of stores will be hydroponic tomatoes from Mexico. So if people are buying organic tomatoes in a supermarket, they could be buying factory food that has never touched the soil.

MM: Can you explain the National Organic Standards Board’s (NOSB) 2010 recommendation on hydroponics and the findings on which that recommendation was based?

DC: The NOSB spent several years really exploring this issue. They had heated debates, and they had public hearings. In the end an overwhelming majority of the advisory board voted for the recommendation, which clearly called for keeping organic vegetables growing entirely in the soil.

This is not a debate about scientific studies on nutrition. This is about the core beliefs of organic agriculture. Feed the soil, not the plant. It sounds simplistic, but it is not naive. It is a profound alternative to what has come to be called “conventional agriculture”.  I am not saying that all of the many alternatives to organic farming are bad or worthless. I am saying that organic farming is based on a particular “systems thinking” about problems and solutions, based on healthy soil.

MM: Why has this issue resurfaced recently in the national conversation after being somewhat under the radar for a while?

DC: The main reason this issue got passed over is that there was almost no hydroponic produce being sold as organic. The hydroponic growers accepted that organic certification was not available to them. In the last five years hydroponic organic certification has resurfaced in a big way. A small group of hydroponic growers, who had no interest in converting to real soil grown organic practices, suddenly realized that they could “become organic” by simply switching what fertilizers they dumped into their fertilizer tanks. It took the real organic farmers a few years to realize what was going on. In fact, most of them still don’t realize what is going on! Unfortunately by the time everybody gets it, “organic” might be reduced to “SORT OF organic.” In the end it is about how we farm, not about what we call it, but I am not thrilled with the idea of giving away something that we all worked so hard to build for so many years.

MM: Do other countries certify hydroponically grown vegetables as organic?

DC: A very few countries will certify hydroponic organic. But Mexico, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and 24 European countries, (including Holland, England, Germany, Italy, France, Belgium, and Spain) all PROHIBIT hydroponic vegetable production to be sold as organic in their own countries. The USDA is almost alone in their reinvention of what organic means.

MM: Why should consumers care about hydroponics being allowed in organic? What can people do to voice their thoughts or concerns on this issue?

DC: That is the big question. Why should people care about real organic? That isn’t a five word answer. Organic farming is based on enhancing and cultivating the wonderful balance of the biological systems in the soil. It isn’t just about replacing chemical fertilizers with “natural” fertilizers. What I care about is learning to work with these infinitely complex biological systems. I think there is such a beauty and grace to organic farming. After 35 years as an organic farmer, I still know very little. I have been to many organic farms, and to many hydroponic farms. I greatly prefer the organic farms. That is what I want to support. This is where I want to work. This is who I want to live next to. This is who I want to buy food from.

The organic I am interested in includes healthy soils, healthy food, healthy eaters, and healthy farmers. One of the great questions is “Can we move towards greater health in these systems and still have the farmers make a living?” The truth is that I don’t think organic food is more expensive, if we factored in things like health costs, which we all pay for. But the truth also is that health costs are not included at the supermarket cash register. Nor are government subsidies. Nor many other hidden costs of industrial farming.  So organic food “costs more”.

I see that people ARE willing to pay more for food that tastes good, that is grown safely for fair pay, and that will help them to stay healthy. We make these choices in our lives. We decide what is important to us. Most people now choose to pay a large monthly fee to be connected to the internet. No one imagined that 30 years ago.

People are making choices to buy local organic food. They are voting with their wallets. The challenge is making that as easy as possible, WITHOUT compromising on what organic means. People don’t want to just buy a label as a placebo. They want to support a system. They want to find connection to that system, and the people involved in growing food in that way.

I don’t know if we can save the word “organic”. But we can try. Sign the petition. Write to Miles MacEvoy and tell him you care. If enough people write letters to the USDA, they will have to respond. Write to your Senators and Representative. Tell your friends. Ask your produce managers where the “organic” food comes from, and how was it grown. Write the newspaper. Blog about it.

In two years we have created much greater awareness. Let’s keep going. Only we can do it. No one else is going to fix this.

If you believe soil is essential to organic systems, email Miles McEvoy, Deputy Administrator of the National Organic Program (NOP) at miles.mcevoy@ams.usda.gov and let him know.  You can also sign the petition to Keep the Soil in Organic at http://www.keepthesoilinorganic.org.

Fall Workshops for Farmers feature soil science and trades skills

 Learn how to think like a mechanic and a detective. Workshops include a hands-on component taking apart and examining the guts of broken equipment.
Learn how
to think like a mechanic and a detective. Workshops include a hands-on component taking apart and examining
the guts of broken equipment.

NOFA-VT is excited to partner with Vermont Tech to offer a special fall workshop series for farmers featuring soil science and trades skills. These two topics are widely different, yet both are critical foundations for successful production. As organic growers, we know that soil is the basis of everything we produce. And as commercial farmers, we also know that we spend a heck of a lot of time fixing, adjusting, installing and jerry-rigging equipment. Both soil building and mechanical know-how require ongoing education coupled with experience learned with the sweat of one’s brow through trial and error. You provide the latter, NOFA-VT will provide the former.

Thanks for your input…which guided the creation of this series! The recent Vermont state water quality initiatives, as well as flooding in recent years, has brought our attention to the negative impact on watersheds caused by farms of all sizes. A spring survey of commercial growers on soil fertility practices, conducted by the University of Vermont and the Vermont Vegetable Growers & Berry Association, was motivated by the collective need to reduce watershed pollution from nitrogen and phosphorus. The survey results illuminated an overall lack of satisfaction among growers with their soil fertility management, an interest in using more cover crops for nitrogen, a desire to work towards long term soil health through on-farm fertility production (like composting and cover cropping), and a need to save money on fertilizers while maximizing yields and balancing soil health.

Our two-part soils series will provide information to help make economical and environmentally sound decisions regarding fertilizer choices, application methods, increasing soil biological diversity, and more.

We are equally excited about our four workshops to improve your trades skills. Some farmers love spending time under the body of tractors or the hood of farm vehicles, others not as much. It takes time, inquisitiveness, patience and perseverance to learn how machines work, and to discover the right tool for the job. There’s of course no shame in hiring someone to do all the fixing and installing, but regardless it is critical to have a familiarity with engines, electrical systems, mechanical parts and such.

The trades skills workshops feature a hands-on component where you can practice what you are learning, for example in our “Tricks for Taking Apart & Fixing Rusted Stuff,” get experience using heat, saws, leverage and key tools you’ll want to run out to buy. Do you know what’s a bearing puller, torch crayon, nut splitter or Woodruff key? Come find out. And for those of you who already have loads of experience, you know as well as anyone that it takes a lifetime of learning, and the opportunity to improve your knowledge with an expert is worth every minute invested.

Workshop descriptions »
Online registration »
Download the brochure (pdf) »

NOFA Vermont’s first Farmer Olympics deliver feisty fun!

The Farmer Olympics were held at the Maple Wind Farms’ fields in Bolton, Vermont on August 12, 2015. There were 12 teams and more than 70 participants competing for the gold.

Read the Burlington Free Press article »
View pictures of the event in a Burlington Free Press photo gallery »
Listen to the Vermont Public Radio story on the Farmer Olympics »

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Go for the gold at the 1st annual “Farmer Olympics”

NOFA-VT Farmer Olympics Bolton, Vermont —Teams from all over Vermont are invited to come together from 4:00 to 8:00 pm on Wednesday, August 12th at the Maple Wind Farm in Bolton to compete in a wide range of events designed to challenge farmers’ field skills. More importantly, the first annual “Farmer Olympics”, hosted by the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont (NOFA Vermont), is a chance to take a mid-season break and enjoy some great food and refreshments along with some healthy competition.

“You work hard, now play hard!” said event organizer Mimi Arnstein, who is also a NOFA Vermont board member. “We invite all finely-trained farmers, as well as members of agricultural organizations, for a farm competition that will go down in the annals of history. Fast and furious, technical and serious, slow and silly…these events will make you laugh while testing your farm team’s skills and pride.”

Competitors will show off their finely-honed skills in contests ranging from physical to cerebral to plain ridiculous, competing in events like: “Chicken Tractor Pull,” “Rock Hump,” “Plumbing Puzzle,” “Chuckin’ Eggs,” and the “Deer Fence Limbo.”

Farmer-Olympians will enjoy treats provided by Ben & Jerry’s, and wood-fired, fresh pizza made in the NOFA Vermont mobile oven.

Teams are invited to register online at www.nofavt.org/ows. The registration rules dictate that teams must have a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 6 people to enter. Each team member must be a part of the farm crew or staff of an agricultural organization. Multiple farms may partner to create a joint team but they must identify something in common (e.g. Farmers Under 30; Left-handed Farmers). Teams should wear a team identifier such as a t-shirt, hat, or bandana.

The Farmer Olympics will take place at Maple Wind Farm, located at 1647 Duxbury Road in Bolton, Vermont on August 12th. Teams are asked to arrive at 4:00 pm to check in and warm up. The competition events are from 4:30 to 6:30 pm, followed by pizza, cider, and celebrations.